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PROJECTS

Filtering by Category: PLAY

WAITING ROOMS · BOSTON

Nathalie Pozzi


The goal of the game you discover through play.
- Eric Zimmerman

Waiting Rooms is a large-scale installation developed with game designer Eric Zimmerman.

This work-in-progress explores the themes of bureaucracy, immigration, economic inequality, and the systematization of contemporary life. The Museum of Science was transformed into a series of absurdist waiting rooms governed by a topsy-turvy social economy through which players progress in sometimes collaborative and sometimes competitive ways.

Over four evenings, eight hundred Visitors stood in line, sat in confusion and frustration, and let time pass in the spaces of Waiting Rooms.


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Location
Museum of Science · Boston

Dates
26-27 September 2017
4-5 October 2017

Visitors
200+200+200+200

Photography
Cris Moor

 

 

Attendant Note:
Storage Room

One man stayed in the room for probably 40 minutes. He didn’t want to go back to where he came. I could tell he thought that something else was going to happen, but it never did. Eventually, he stole a ton of stuff and went on his way.

 
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Attendant Note:
Forms Room

There was an unusual interaction when one guest pulled out his own blue tape! I’m not sure where he got it from and he tried to create his own lines. Perhaps he did something similar in other rooms.

 
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Attendant Note:
Bingo Room

A Visitor was stuck in the bingo room for over an hour. He noted that the counters didn’t work well, that the rapidly speaking, erratically inconsistent bingo caller was frustrating and, smiling, said it was a "special hell.”

 
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Attendant Note:
Map Room

One person had only 9 blue tickets, not 10, and offered a chuck e. cheese ticket for the 10th. LOL

 
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Thanks to

Lisa Monrose
James Wetzel

All the Attendants from the Museum of Science

 

FLATLANDS · PARIS

Nathalie Pozzi


Originally commissioned by
Babycastles

Venue
New York City · 2010

 

Flatlands is fictional archive for nearly 200 game boards. Within this theatrical space, two players compete to find the perfect board to please a judge and win the game.

Each round, players play cards from their hand that create changing criteria for the comparison. There are adjective cards and noun cards, which combine to make statements like colorless geometries or nostalgic characters. (Of course, colorless characters or nostalgic geometries are just as possible.) The players argue their case before the judge, who picks the winner.

In Flatlands, the field of play is a cultural space, as players argue over visual aesthetics and social meanings of the colorful game boards. It is also a narrative space with a fable-like quality – two archivists search through a randomly organized collection of objects and then present their case to a judge, whose word is law.


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Exhibition
D-DAYS

Gallery
Musée des Arts décoratifs · Paris

Dates
2nd May · 14th May  2017

Photography
Baptiste Heller

 
 
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army
blood
brains
circle
civilization
colonizers
comfort
conflict
conquest
cries
decisions
destiny
determination
egoism
enemies
fate
force
friends
earth
hearts
heroes
history
hour
ignorance
illusions
impulses
injustices
justice

manifestation
men
moments
mountains
nations
peace
people
poets
power
promises
revolution
rhythm
rights
saints
sanctions
seas
shadow
soldiers
souls
spectacle
spirit
squares
temples
victory
war
women
world

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WAITING ROOMS · NEW YORK CITY

Nathalie Pozzi


The goal of the game you discover through play.
- Eric Zimmerman

Waiting Rooms is a large-scale installation developed with game designer Eric Zimmerman.

This work-in-progress explores the themes of bureaucracy, immigration, economic inequality, and the systematization of contemporary life. The Rubin Museum was transformed into a series of absurdist waiting rooms governed by a topsy-turvy social economy through which players progress in sometimes collaborative and sometimes competitive ways.


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Location
The Rubin Museum of Arts · New York City

Event · Brainwave
Supported by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.
Presented in collaboration with Psychology Today.

Year
2016

Photography
Ida C. Benedetto

 

 
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Thanks to:

Tim McHenry
Nicole Leist
Laura Lombard

Kaho Abe
Corrine Brenner
Mattie Brice
Ruth Charny
Naomi Clark
Stephen Clark
Ric Delgado
Kaitlyn Ellison
Justin Field
Gwynna Forgham-Thrift
Nick Fortugno
Aaron Freedman
Jesse Fuchs
Aaron Gaudette
Dalton Gray
Julian Hyde
Alexander King
Flourish Klink
Sydney Mainster
James Marion
Andrea Morales
Toni Pizza
Ben Rotko
Ben Sironko
Winnie Song
Jimi Stine
Geoff Suthers
Tim Szetela
Jonathan Zungre

Read more:

26 April 16
Kill Screen · Waiting Rooms


by MICHELLE EHRHARDT
@ChelleEhrhardt

 

 

 
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STARRY HEAVENS · SMITHSONIAN

Nathalie Pozzi


Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing awe: the starry heavens above and the moral law within.

Immanuel Kant's Tombstone Inscription

Starry Heavens is a large-scale installation designed with game designer Eric Zimmerman.

Originally commissioned for an event at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 2011, Starry Heavens was recently installed in the Kogod Courtyard of the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of “America Now - Innovation in Art” in June 2015.

The game itself is a kind of moral fable. The central player - the Ruler - commands all of the other players, telling them how and where to move. Players must work with and against each other to overthrow the Ruler, who stands at the center pulling down a central balloon in an ironically futile gesture.

In the past, Starry Heavens has been played outdoors, often at night: from MoMA’s sculpture garden to the courtyard of the Stedelijk Museum in 's-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands) to Karl-Marx-Allee, the monumental socialist boulevard of Berlin. The Kogod Courtyard, although indoors, has many qualities of an outdoor space. The challenge was to develop a large form that would feel coherent with the majestic scale of the space and the undulations of the glass roof.

Technical constraints included a light overall weight, since anchoring from the glass roof structure was not possible. Other considerations included access to power sources, as well as planning for a very short setup time and working within the limited height of the vertical lifts used for installation. The final version of the curve is a cold air inflated, suspended structure which was fabricated with the consultancy of the Netherlands-based firm Air Design Studio / Erik van Dongen.

The large white curve integrates the project into the space and focuses viewers on the spectacle of play through a performative construction. Starry Heavens is both a game to be played as well as a performance to be spectated. The intent is for the project to be equally engaging for those people who want to jump in and play, but also for those who prefer to stay on the side and… just watch.


Large-scale physical game

A project with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Location
Kogod Courtyard · Smithsonian American Art Museum · Washington, DC

Event
“America Now Innovation in Art”

In collaboration with
Air Design Studio · consultant and fabricator of cold air inflatable
Clara Ranenfir · 3d modeling and design development

Year
2015

More details about Starry Heavens

Photography
© Susana Raab (event)
© Nathalie Pozzi (installation)

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INTERFERENCE · LOS ANGELES

Nathalie Pozzi


2-26 October 2013

Interference is being exhibited in Los Angeles by LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions). The work is installed at Track 16 Gallery, in the historic Hayden Tract neighborhood of Culver City.

Interference is presented in partnership with the USC Roski School of Fine Arts, Track 16 Gallery and Indiecade International Festival of Independent Games.

More details about Interference

 
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The exhibition of Interference in LA was made possible with support from USC Visions and Voices: The Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Pasadena Art Alliance, and the National Performance Network Community Fund.

Nathalie Pozzi and Eric Zimmerman’s residency to present Interference has been generously provided by the Visual Artists Network, a program of the National Performance Network, whose major contributors are the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Pollock- Krasner Foundation.

FLATLANDS II

Nathalie Pozzi


Flatlands is fictional archive for nearly 200 game boards. Within this theatrical space, two players compete to find the perfect board to please a judge and win the game.

Each round, players play cards from their hand that create changing criteria for the comparison. There are adjective cards and noun cards, which combine to make statements like colorless geometries or nostalgic characters. (Of course, colorless characters or nostalgic geometries are just as possible.) The players argue their case before the judge, who picks the winner.

In Flatlands, the field of play is a cultural space, as players argue over visual aesthetics and social meanings of the colorful game boards. It is also a narrative space with a fable-like quality - two archivists search through a randomly organized collection of objects and then present their case to a judge, whose word is law.

 

Originally commissioned by
Babycastles

Venue
New York City · 2010

 

 

Photo
© 2013 Dane Sponberg


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Exhibition
XYZ · Alternative Voices in Game Design

Venue
Museum of Design Atlanta

Year
2013

More details about Flatlands

 
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INTERFERENCE · DUBLIN AND MOSCOW

Nathalie Pozzi


15 November 2012 - 20 January 2013

Interference is being exhibited at the Science Gallery in Dublin, as part of the exhibition GAME: THE FUTURE OF PLAY.

The exhibition is then traveling to Moscow, at the ZIL Palace of Culture, presented by the Moscow Polytechnical Museum.

More details about the exhibition
More details about Interference

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Science Gallery is an initiative of the Trinity College Dublin

STARRY HEAVENS · BERLIN

Nathalie Pozzi


9-11 August 2012

Starry Heavens is being installed in Berlin, under the trees of Karl-Marx-Allee, the monumental socialist boulevard built by the GDR in the 1950s.

The project is part of Playpublik, a festival for playful public spaces.

Collaborating with the team at Invisible Playground, we modified the game rules, added lights inside the balloons, and intertwined the game play with the music of a live band.

More details about Starry Heavens

 
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Playpublik – Festival for Playful Public Spaces

Produced by Kulturkontakte e.V. in cooperation with the Computer Games Museum Berlin

Curated by Invisible Playground

Funding from the German Federal Cultural Foundation, the Embassy of the United States of America, the Einstein Foundation Berlin, and the Graduate School for the Arts and Sciences at the Berlin University of the Arts and British Council

INTERFERENCE · PARIS

Nathalie Pozzi


Interference is a social and strategic game where you win by stealing from other players.

Five suspended, super-thin steel walls, dotted with patterns resembling cell tissues, act as vertical game boards. Each turn you must steal a piece from another game going on between other players.

While each match takes place in a local area of one of the walls, the games themselves can move across the walls – and games even collide with each other as they drift across the walls’ surfaces. Interference encourages players to negotiate, argue, and scheme with and against each other, across physical space, social space, and the spaces between games.

 

Interference won the IndieCade Interaction Award in 2012.
It has recently been exhibited in Los AngelesDublin and Moscow.

 

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Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Commissioned for the exhibition
Joue le Jeu

Venue
la Gaîté Lyrique · Paris

Design collaborators
Rebecca Jones Sterling · Tim Szetela

Stainless steel panels · five walls · 3m x 3m each
manufactured by Caino Design · Italy

Carpentry · poplar wood pawns
manufactured by Adelina Blanc, Antonio Cozza, Tarcisio Pozzi

Photo · © 2012 Maxime Dufour Photographies
Video · © 2012 Emeric Adrian

 

 
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TIMES SQUARE HEART · NYC

Nathalie Pozzi


 

NYC Heart is a playful light installation proposed for New York City’s annual Valentine’s Day celebration.

The work invites Times Square visitors to step within a cloud of hovering lights – mounted on 600 thin steel poles -  and experience, for a short moment, a comforting, human-scaled moment of play.

The design gives a nod to the transient nature of Times Square and the blurriness of light and love.


Proposal for New York’s annual Valentine’s Day celebration

Lead Designer
Nakworks
with
LoT
Game/Interaction Designer
Eric Zimmerman

Status
Shortlisted proposal

Location
Times Square, New York City

Year
2012

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STARRY HEAVENS · MoMA NYC

Nathalie Pozzi


Starry Heavens is a game that incorporates a life-sized gameboard of 67 steel plates and ten large-scale, helium-filled meteorological balloons.

It is a social and strategic game that is also a moral fable - for one Ruler and any number of silent players. The Ruler stands in the center and calls out “BLACK,” “WHITE,” or “GRAY” – commanding the other players how to move. The game creates a stylized dance, as players shift about the gameboard, working with and against each other to overthrow the Ruler.

The game unfolds within a space defined by the gigantic hovering balloons. The Ruler’s goal is to stay in power long enough to pull down a central helium balloon.

A later staging of the game in Berlin incorporated a live band that improvised along with the Ruler’s commands, making the Ruler the conductor of a procedural musical experience.

Video
Daniel Wilson · with music by Michael Sweet

Photo credits
Rebecca Jones, Philip Reuta, Abigail Simon, Raymond Yeung


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Originally commissioned for
ARCADE  ·  event organized by Kill Screen

Location
Museum of Modern Art’s sculpture garden · New York City

Date
27 July 2011

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FLATLANDS I

Nathalie Pozzi


Flatlands is fictional archive for nearly 200 game boards. Within this theatrical space, two players compete to find the perfect board to please a judge and win the game.

Each round, players play cards from their hand that create changing criteria for the comparison. There are adjective cards and noun cards, which combine to make statements like colorless geometries or nostalgic characters. (Of course, colorless characters or nostalgic geometries are just as possible.) The players argue their case before the judge, who picks the winner.

In Flatlands, the field of play is a cultural space, as players argue over visual aesthetics and social meanings of the colorful game boards. It is also a narrative space with a fable-like quality - two archivists search through a randomly organized collection of objects and then present their case to a judge, whose word is law.

 

Flatland was originally commissioned by Babycastles in 2010 for their Manhattan gallery.

It has since appeared in 2013 at the Museum of Design Atlanta’s exhibition XYZ – Alternative Voices in Game Design and in 2017 at the D-DAYS in Paris.


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Exhibition by
Babycastles, in collaboration with Showpaper

Curator
Matthew Hawkins

Graphic design
Rachel Morris

Location
New York City

Year
2010

 

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DRIFT

Nathalie Pozzi


DRIFT is a game that takes the form of a building. This is no accident: the constraints of Sukkot building construction very much resemble the rules of a game.

 

Soft cotton felt modular shapes, set within a wandering lattice, suggest the fabric of temporary tent dwellings. The game of DRIFT uses this wall and ceiling grid as a game board labyrinth where players seek each other, drifting across the structure.

Traditionally, a Sukkah exists within an established domestic sphere. But the inhabitants of Sukkah City will be strangers. DRIFT uses play to bring its urban visitors together, weaving new social bonds as they explore, meet, and share with each other.


Large-scale physical installation

Status
Proposal

Competition
Sukkah City: NYC 2010

Venue
Union Square NYC

Collaboration with
Designer Clara Klein
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Year
2010

 

 
 
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Suggested play

Two or more visitors stand far apart.
Each player begins by touching a blue oasis object. Your goal is to encounter another player at an oasis.

Drift by traveling along the grid in a continuous line, tracing a path with your finger. When you reach an oasis or an edge, stop moving, change direction and begin traveling again.

When you and another player arrive at the same oasis, you win. Remove the oasis from the wall and share something with each other: some food, a secret, or perhaps just a laugh.

When you are finished, place the oasis in a new location.

 

 
 
 
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SIXTEEN TONS

Nathalie Pozzi


In Sixteen Tons, four players bribe each other with real money in order to win. Heavy sections of steel pipe are the game pieces - but you can’t move your own pieces. Instead, when the game starts you take three dollars from your wallet and use that money to pay others to move your pieces for you.

This intense social and strategic play is enclosed in a surrounding wall with narrow openings, giving Sixteen Tons the feeling of a clandestine betting pit. The intentionally ambiguous rules don’t tell players what to do with each others’ dollars - and by the end of the game the winner usually has no money left .

 

You load sixteen tons, and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt.
-Tennessee Ernie Ford

Thanks to Stephen Bodnar at SCAD for fabricating the game pieces and to curator John Sharp for his support.


Large-scale physical game

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Commissioned by
Art History of Games, a conference and exhibition organized by Savannah College of Art & Design and Georgia Tech

Location
Atlanta

Year
2010

Sponsors
Walls by Molo Design

 

 
 
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