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PROJECTS

2ND STREET · NYC

Nathalie Pozzi


 

This small home occupies the top floor of a 1901 building on a lively, tree-lined Manhattan street. Although only 420 square feet, the original layout of the apartment has four distinct main spaces: living room, office, kitchen, and bedroom - in a two-by-two grid in which each room connects to two others. The compact, century-old layout feels inexplicably contemporary.

During the interior renovation, this remarkably efficient layout was only minimally modified. And yet, by slightly shifting the position of two passages, the entire usable space was efficiently optimized. A loft bed doubles the available floor space in the bedroom; the kitchen gains room for a table; the small office is expanded vertically, with supplies and documents stacked in a custom vertical shelf system.

In such an intimate space, small details become crucial: the undulating outline of plywood panels along the uneven profile of the walls, hand-cut silhouettes that frame heating pipes, cabinetry that follows the slope of the floor.

These details accumulate in the space, but through their careful arrangement, they somehow disappear, into a narrowness that is calm, open, and serene.

[Project Brief]


Interior renovation of a 420 Sf apartment

Location
New York City

Year
2018

Carpentry work
Takeshi Miyakawa

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"And there is almost no space here; and you feel almost calm at the thought that it is impossible for anything very large to hold in this narrowness."

Rainer Maria Rilke
as quoted in Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

 
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A new light grey color – inspired by the original grey floor of the office - unifies all of the new built-in elements: the bedroom loft unit, kitchen storage, bathroom cabinet, library shelves. Small hints of grey also spread to other minor details, such as the steps of the bedroom ladders. The daylight coming from three directions varies the gray hues subtly throughout the day and across the seasons.

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Despite this rather neutral palette, retained original features give the home a strong sense of materiality. The existing plastered walls, with their rough surface and finish, were restored and painted in a matte light grey tint. The existing floorboards, although rough and unleveled (the slope is nine inches from end to end), were kept in their original condition.

 
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A careful selection of fixtures and furniture also optimizes the use and flow of the space.

Custom cabinets, together with ADA-compliant kitchen appliances, allow the kitchen countertop to maintain a limited height - especially given the significant slope of the floor. The bathroom sink is large, yet thin metal walls keep it unobtrusive.

Two egg-shaped tables, curved back chairs, and a small rounded sofa allow movement to flow from space to space, unhindered by strong corners and volumes. The custom kitchen sink is large in width but subtly narrow in depth, with the faucet set on the side to minimize the volume; and a removable draining shelf adding functional flexibility.

 
 

Storage areas are hidden in plain sight, behind bare, light grey plywood panels, with no visible handles or hardware. Accessible from the side, these shelves contribute to the feeling of lightness and openness throughout.

Like hidden secrets, the plywood panels conceal storage where it is most needed: at the entrance, where keys and letters are left, behind the bathroom sink, as a reinvented medicine cabinet, and by the kitchen sink, to store cutlery and everyday implements.

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The distinction between functions - eating, sleeping, working, bathing - is regulated by the careful design of thresholds and boundaries, sometimes permeable and transient, sometimes more definitive. It is remarkable to find in this limited space six windows, seven doorways and a different declination for each threshold.

 
 
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The doorway between the living room and office is wide and open, and yet the floors change in color, keeping the identity of the two spaces separate but still permeable and symbiotic. The passage between the bedroom and the kitchen is low, deep and narrow, acting as a kind of “gate” that separates the spaces, while providing visual privacy to the upper bed loft. A doorway and an interior window, both original to the apartment, connect the kitchen with the living room. The window lets light flow through from the kitchen, without exposing the more formal living area to the cooking and dining spaces.

 
 
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Within these rather small spaces, a complex narrative emerges through the alternation of low and tall ceilings, wide and narrow doorways, dark and light floors, dense and empty wall surfaces. The overall composition of space is also enhanced by the unfolding of multiple options to move from room to room, resulting in layered views and flowing circulation.

 
 
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Exposed brick walls and a red tin bathroom ceiling remain untouched. Considering that the apartment is located on the 6th floor without an elevator, reducing transportation of materials was also a consideration.

 
 
 
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FLATLANDS · PARIS

Nathalie Pozzi


Originally commissioned by
Babycastles

Venue
New York City · 2010

 

Flatlands is fictional archive for nearly 200 game boards. Within this theatrical space, two players compete to find the perfect board to please a judge and win the game.

Each round, players play cards from their hand that create changing criteria for the comparison. There are adjective cards and noun cards, which combine to make statements like colorless geometries or nostalgic characters. (Of course, colorless characters or nostalgic geometries are just as possible.) The players argue their case before the judge, who picks the winner.

In Flatlands, the field of play is a cultural space, as players argue over visual aesthetics and social meanings of the colorful game boards. It is also a narrative space with a fable-like quality – two archivists search through a randomly organized collection of objects and then present their case to a judge, whose word is law.


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Exhibition
D-DAYS

Gallery
Musée des Arts décoratifs · Paris

Dates
2nd May · 14th May  2017

Photography
Baptiste Heller

 
 
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army
blood
brains
circle
civilization
colonizers
comfort
conflict
conquest
cries
decisions
destiny
determination
egoism
enemies
fate
force
friends
earth
hearts
heroes
history
hour
ignorance
illusions
impulses
injustices
justice

manifestation
men
moments
mountains
nations
peace
people
poets
power
promises
revolution
rhythm
rights
saints
sanctions
seas
shadow
soldiers
souls
spectacle
spirit
squares
temples
victory
war
women
world

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MAISON BÉRARD · ALPS [progress update]

Nathalie Pozzi


The building sits in the old core of the village, adjacent to a dense forest. It was constructed in the 1950s, following a traditional Alpine “tower house” model, and was later renovated in the 1980s.

The renovation maintains the existing features and oddities of the original 1950s structure. The ceilings are low (barely 200 cm in places), and the rooms and windows are small. Yet everything is well-proportioned to the overall modest footprint of the house: 5.5 by 5.5 meters.

New elements introduced to the building include thin white steel stairs that connect the three upper levels and basement, integrating the overall space. Two added skylights bring in soft and diffuse interior light. The interior wood paneling and the original windows in dark reddish larch evoke a strong feeling of warmth, in this region of long, cold winters.

The renovation will result in a home that combines contemporary elegance and subtlety of detail, while honoring the quiet strength of the original dwelling and the way it transitions from the social life of the village to its surrounding natural environment.

 

Renovation of an Alpine dwelling

Status
completed

Location
Cogne · Italy

Year
2013 design development
2016 comlpeted

Photo:
Paolo Rey

 

 
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WAITING ROOMS · NEW YORK CITY

Nathalie Pozzi


The goal of the game you discover through play.
- Eric Zimmerman

 

Waiting Rooms is a large-scale installation designed with game designer Eric Zimmerman.

This work-in-progress explores the themes of bureaucracy, immigration, economic inequality, and the systematization of contemporary life. The Rubin Museum was transformed into a series of absurdist waiting rooms governed by a topsy-turvy social economy through which players progress in sometimes collaborative and sometimes competitive ways.


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Location
The Rubin Museum of Arts · New York City

Event
Brainwave Series · Brainwave is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Waiting Rooms is presented in collaboration with Psychology Today.

Year
2016

Photography
Ida C. Benedetto

 

 
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Thanks to:

Tim McHenry
Nicole Leist
Laura Lombard

Kaho Abe
Corrine Brenner
Mattie Brice
Ruth Charny
Naomi Clark
Stephen Clark
Ric Delgado
Kaitlyn Ellison
Justin Field
Gwynna Forgham-Thrift
Nick Fortugno
Aaron Freedman
Jesse Fuchs
Aaron Gaudette
Dalton Gray
Julian Hyde
Alexander King
Flourish Klink
Sydney Mainster
James Marion
Andrea Morales
Toni Pizza
Ben Rotko
Ben Sironko
Winnie Song
Jimi Stine
Geoff Suthers
Tim Szetela
Jonathan Zungre

Read more:

26 April 16
Kill Screen · Waiting Rooms


by MICHELLE EHRHARDT
@ChelleEhrhardt

 

 

 
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MONOCHROME · PLAYTEST CARPET

Nathalie Pozzi


Monochrome Playtest Carpet is constructed out of large felt wool balls, with a diameter that ranges from 2 cm to 3 cm (3/4″ to 1″). The playful irregularity of the balls and the outline shape give the carpet the random terrain of a map. The soft, bumpy contour creates a pleasurable surface for standing, sitting or lying.

Monochrome Playtest Carpet comes in groups or 2 or 3 standard pieces. The modular units are designed to be assembled into multiple compositions. Like a spreading amoeba, the carpets form a wide variety of layouts.

Monochrome Playtest Carpet comes with the GoodWeave seal of approval. GoodWeave is an international initiative against child labor in the carpet manufacturing industry.

GoodWeave fulfills its mission by advocating for certified child-labor-free rugs, monitoring supply chains, rescuing and educating child laborers, and providing critical services for weaving families. Each of our GoodWeave-certified carpets are provided with a seal and a serial number.

To learn more visit GoodWeave.org

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Carpet design

Sizes
Medium · Long
Custom sizes available

Colors
Grey · Teal · Yellow Ochre
Custom color available

Material
Handmade woolen felt balls

Manufactured in
Nepal

Year
2015

 
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STARRY HEAVENS · SMITHSONIAN

Nathalie Pozzi


Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing awe: the starry heavens above and the moral law within.

Immanuel Kant's Tombstone Inscription

Starry Heavens is a large-scale installation designed with game designer Eric Zimmerman.

Originally commissioned for an event at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 2011, Starry Heavens was recently installed in the Kogod Courtyard of the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of “America Now - Innovation in Art” in June 2015.

The game itself is a kind of moral fable. The central player - the Ruler - commands all of the other players, telling them how and where to move. Players must work with and against each other to overthrow the Ruler, who stands at the center pulling down a central balloon in an ironically futile gesture.

In the past, Starry Heavens has been played outdoors, often at night: from MoMA’s sculpture garden to the courtyard of the Stedelijk Museum in 's-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands) to Karl-Marx-Allee, the monumental socialist boulevard of Berlin. The Kogod Courtyard, although indoors, has many qualities of an outdoor space. The challenge was to develop a large form that would feel coherent with the majestic scale of the space and the undulations of the glass roof.

Technical constraints included a light overall weight, since anchoring from the glass roof structure was not possible. Other considerations included access to power sources, as well as planning for a very short setup time and working within the limited height of the vertical lifts used for installation. The final version of the curve is a cold air inflated, suspended structure which was fabricated with the consultancy of the Netherlands-based firm Air Design Studio / Erik van Dongen.

The large white curve integrates the project into the space and focuses viewers on the spectacle of play through a performative construction. Starry Heavens is both a game to be played as well as a performance to be spectated. The intent is for the project to be equally engaging for those people who want to jump in and play, but also for those who prefer to stay on the side and… just watch.


Large-scale physical game

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Location
Kogod Courtyard · Smithsonian American Art Museum · Washington, DC

Event
“America Now Innovation in Art”

Team
Air Design Studio / Erik van Dongen · consultant and fabricator of cold air inflatable
Clara Ranenfir · 3d modeling and design development

Year
2015

More details about Starry Heavens

Photography
© Susana Raab (event)
© Nathalie Pozzi (installation)

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SURE WE CAN · NEW YORK CITY

Nathalie Pozzi


 

Sure We Can is a non-profit recycling center, community space and sustainability hub in Brooklyn where canners, who are people that collect cans and bottles from to streets to make a living, come together with students and neighbors through recycling, composting, gardening and arts. 

[Its] mission is to support the local community, particularly the most vulnerable residents, and promote social inclusion, environmental awareness and economic empowerment. For over 9 years, Sure We Can has served the community of canners, and today it has evolved into a community center that promotes a sustainable urban culture and facilitates a circular economy.

www.surewecan.org


Adjustable sorting system for the non-profit recycling center Sure We Can

Collaboration with
Clara Ranenfir

Location
Sure We Can · Brooklyn· New York City

Thanks to the donation of
Sonotube

Year
2015

Photography
Abigail Simon

 
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LIBRARY · NYU GAME CENTER / MAGNET

Nathalie Pozzi


The Game Center is the Department of Game Design at the Tisch School of the Arts / New York University.  The NYU Game Center is dedicated to the exploration of games as a cultural form and game design as creative practice.

 

The Library provides access to digital games within a context of critical analysis and discussion. With a catalog of nearly 3,000 game titles, the library is a community center, hosting student clubs, curated exhibitions, and tournaments.

 

The furniture system is designed to adjust to the many activities of the Open Library. The elements include  a desk, custom shelves for board games, cartridges and books, movable shelves for technical equipment and consoles, and boardgames tables.

 

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Furniture and space identity design

Client
NYU Game Center · Open Library

Tisch School of the Arts

Location
Magnet Center, Brooklyn, New York

Year
2015

In collaboration with:
Takeshi Miyakawa Design

 
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CLINTON STREET · NYC

Nathalie Pozzi


Waka Waka: a temporary hub for New York City’s indie game community.

The space - a bright 2,000 square foot storefront - works as a game incubator, gallery, event and co-working space.

 

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Space design and project management for temporary installation

Client
Waka Waka

Status
Completed

Location
Clinton Street · New York City

Year
2014

Collaboration
Livia di Mario
Paolo Agostinelli

 

INTERFERENCE · LOS ANGELES

Nathalie Pozzi


2-26 October 2013

Interference is being exhibited in Los Angeles by LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions). The work is installed at Track 16 Gallery, in the historic Hayden Tract neighborhood of Culver City.

Interference is presented in partnership with the USC Roski School of Fine Arts, Track 16 Gallery and Indiecade International Festival of Independent Games.

More details about Interference

 
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The exhibition of Interference in LA was made possible with support from USC Visions and Voices: The Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Pasadena Art Alliance, and the National Performance Network Community Fund.

Nathalie Pozzi and Eric Zimmerman’s residency to present Interference has been generously provided by the Visual Artists Network, a program of the National Performance Network, whose major contributors are the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Pollock- Krasner Foundation.

FLATLANDS II

Nathalie Pozzi


Flatlands is fictional archive for nearly 200 game boards. Within this theatrical space, two players compete to find the perfect board to please a judge and win the game.

Each round, players play cards from their hand that create changing criteria for the comparison. There are adjective cards and noun cards, which combine to make statements like colorless geometries or nostalgic characters. (Of course, colorless characters or nostalgic geometries are just as possible.) The players argue their case before the judge, who picks the winner.

In Flatlands, the field of play is a cultural space, as players argue over visual aesthetics and social meanings of the colorful game boards. It is also a narrative space with a fable-like quality - two archivists search through a randomly organized collection of objects and then present their case to a judge, whose word is law.

 

Originally commissioned by
Babycastles

Venue
New York City · 2010

 

 

Photo
© 2013 Dane Sponberg


Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Exhibition
XYZ · Alternative Voices in Game Design

Venue
Museum of Design Atlanta

Year
2013

More details about Flatlands

 
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GREY · PLAYTEST CARPET · COPENHAGEN

Nathalie Pozzi


The carpet was crafted by hand in Nepal and the soft, bumpy contour creates a pleasurable surface for standing, sitting or lying. The irregularity of the balls and the outline shape are reminiscent of a lichen and its unpredictable filaments.

 

Carpet design

Size
150cm by 150cm

Material
3000 handmade woolen felt balls

Manufactured by a fair trade company in
Nepal

Year
2013

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GREY · PLAYTEST CARPET

Nathalie Pozzi


Playtest Carpet is constructed out of large felt wool balls, with a diameter that ranges from 2 cm to 3 cm (3/4″ to 1″). The playful irregularity of the balls and the outline shape give the carpet the random terrain of a map. The soft, bumpy contour creates a pleasurable surface for standing, sitting or lying.

Playtest Carpet comes in three standard sized (small, medium and long runner). The modular units are designed to be assembled into multiple compositions. Like a spreading amoeba, the carpets form a wide variety of layouts.


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Carpet design

Sizes
small · medium · long runner

Colors
Grey · Teal · Yellow Ochre

Material
handmade woolen felt balls

Manufactured in
Nepal

Year
2013

 

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MAISON BÉRARD · ALPS

Nathalie Pozzi


 

The building sits in the old core of the village, adjacent to a dense forest. It was constructed in the 1950s, following a traditional Alpine “tower house” model, and was later renovated in the 1980s.

The renovation maintains the existing features and oddities of the original 1950s structure. The ceilings are low (barely 200 cm in places), and the rooms and windows are small. Yet everything is well-proportioned to the overall modest footprint of the house: 5.5 by 5.5 meters.

New elements introduced to the building include thin white steel stairs that connect the three upper levels and basement, integrating the overall space. Two added skylights bring in soft and diffuse interior light. The interior wood paneling and the original windows in dark reddish larch evoke a strong feeling of warmth, in this region of long, cold winters.

The renovation will result in a home that combines contemporary elegance and subtlety of detail, while honoring the quiet strength of the original dwelling and the way it transitions from the social life of the village to its surrounding natural environment.


Renovation of an Alpine dwelling

Status
2013 design development
2016 completed

Location
Cogne · Italy

Year
2013

 

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INTERFERENCE · DUBLIN AND MOSCOW

Nathalie Pozzi


15 November 2012 - 20 January 2013

Interference is being exhibited at the Science Gallery in Dublin, as part of the exhibition GAME: THE FUTURE OF PLAY.

The exhibition is then traveling to Moscow, at the ZIL Palace of Culture, presented by the Moscow Polytechnical Museum.

More details about the exhibition
More details about Interference

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Science Gallery is an initiative of the Trinity College Dublin

STARRY HEAVENS · BERLIN

Nathalie Pozzi


9-11 August 2012

Starry Heavens is being installed in Berlin, under the trees of Karl-Marx-Allee, the monumental socialist boulevard built by the GDR in the 1950s.

The project is part of Playpublik, a festival for playful public spaces.

Collaborating with the team at Invisible Playground, we modified the game rules, added lights inside the balloons, and intertwined the game play with the music of a live band.

More details about Starry Heavens

 
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Playpublik – Festival for Playful Public Spaces

Produced by Kulturkontakte e.V. in cooperation with the Computer Games Museum Berlin

Curated by Invisible Playground

Funding from the German Federal Cultural Foundation, the Embassy of the United States of America, the Einstein Foundation Berlin, and the Graduate School for the Arts and Sciences at the Berlin University of the Arts and British Council

OPEN LIBRARY · NYU GAME CENTER / TISCH

Nathalie Pozzi


The Game Center is an interdisciplinary program at New York University that explores the design and development of games as a creative practice.

The Open Library provides access to digital games within a context of critical analysis and discussion. With a catalogue of nearly 3,000 game titles, the library is a community center, hosting student clubs, curated exhibitions, and tournaments.

The modular furniture system is designed to adjust to the many activities of the Open Library. The elements include a 10' long desk, movable shelves, and rolling stools that use magnets to form a larger board game table.

 

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Furniture and space identity design

Client:
NYU Game Center · Open Library

Location:
Tisch School of the Arts, New York City

Year:
2012

In collaboration with:
Takeshi Miyakawa Design

 
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INTERFERENCE · PARIS

Nathalie Pozzi


Interference is a social and strategic game where you win by stealing from other players.

Five suspended, super-thin steel walls, dotted with patterns resembling cell tissues, act as vertical game boards. Each turn you must steal a piece from another game going on between other players.

While each match takes place in a local area of one of the walls, the games themselves can move across the walls – and games even collide with each other as they drift across the walls’ surfaces. Interference encourages players to negotiate, argue, and scheme with and against each other, across physical space, social space, and the spaces between games.

 

Interference won the IndieCade Interaction Award in 2012.
It has recently been exhibited in Los AngelesDublin and Moscow.

 

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Large-scale physical installation

Collaboration with
Game designer Eric Zimmerman

Commissioned for the exhibition
Joue le Jeu

Venue
la Gaîté Lyrique · Paris

Design collaborators
Rebecca Jones Sterling · Tim Szetela

Stainless steel panels · five walls · 3m x 3m each
manufactured by Caino Design · Italy

Carpentry · poplar wood pawns
manufactured by Adelina Blanc, Antonio Cozza, Tarcisio Pozzi

Photo · © 2012 Maxime Dufour Photographies
Video · © 2012 Emeric Adrian

 

 
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